Guest post: Bass fishing in the USA: experience and tips

Fishing holds a special place is our heart and has been America’s favourite pastime for the

last few decades (one might think it is baseball but I beg to differ ;). Even youths nowadays

are participating in fishing activities be it with families or competitively. I have found out

about the statistics regarding them and I was pleasantly shocked. So according to statistics,

the number of youth participants in fishing in the US recorded a whopping of a 10.69 million

in the year 2014! It’s a bit far behind but I am pretty amazed.

 

Us Americans are blessed with tons of lakes and rivers. It is no wonder why fishing is

becoming increasingly popular. What I’d like to talk about is bass fishing because what

would Americans be without bass fishing? Everybody knows bass is abundant in the US.

Americans just love bass fishing because this species is known to be a highly curious and

extremely aggressive species which causes them to be an ideal fish to be caught on your

hook. The bass can be found literally anywhere and everywhere in America due to its

adaptability even in extremely harsh water and weather conditions which makes it a hardy

fish.

 

Since this fish is naturally curious and aggressive in nature, different lures can be used to

catch them as it triggers their instinctive primal instincts such as their territorial behaviour,

anger, hunger and etcetera. There are differences in the largemouth and smallmouth bass in

terms of the way they put up their fight. I prefer the smallies because they are quick,

extremely aggressive and agile, and competitive as hell despite being on the smaller than the

largemouth. Did you know that competitive sport fishing is actually considered as an official

event is some high schools? In this case, Illinois was the first state to officially recognise

sport fishing as sport for students to participate in the year 2009.

My experience is not as broad as the bass fishing experts here in the US but I have been

fishing in a couple of states here and there. I have got to say Michigan, Florida and Texas are

my top choices of all.

Yosemite National Park

Michigan

Michigan State is surrounded by Great Lakes and is ruled by smallmouth bass which makes it

an angling heaven for bass fishing enthusiasts (like me). Michigan and Ontario shares Lake

St. Clair which is always in the BASS Top lists literally almost every year. I have caught

plenty of 3 and 4 pounds bass here.

 

Northern Michigan is notorious for its smallies and literally in every lake you find there’s

bound to be tons of smallies that fight hard and play for you to fish. Water clarity here isn’t a

joke at all compared to the southern areas of Michigan where the water can turn dingy and

cloudy. The best time I went fishing there was around July last year where I used surface

lures to hook ‘em up. The visual was insane! I got to see amazing sights of the fish swimming

up to the surface to bite the bait I have thrown in. the splash the smallies created was

beautiful. I’d definitely recommend any of you out of the US to visit there some day! You

can check out Michigan’s DNR Official website on their lakes

(http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/)

Frio River In The Texas Hill Country

Texas

Texas is all about being bigger and better and I can’t deny that it does have a bit of an

advantage over other states due to its size. If I want to catch a 9 or 10 pound bass, I’d

definitely go for Texas. First off, Amistad is a reservoir that is worth your effort, even though

it’s really far from living areas, to fish which is close to Del Rio especially during the

summer and spring.

 

Top-water anglers enjoy going here to fish because its river, the Rio Grande River is a really

fertile river that provides an abundance source of food for the bass and aquatic organisms

living there. To top it off, its waters are usually always clear with super deep canyons that

provide excellent covers for the bass. You can practically fish for the entire day!

I enjoy shallow fishing a lot and my favourite experience would be at Caddo Lake. The

tranquil and peaceful environment makes it perfect for an all year-round shallow fishing. I

love challenging myself by using super light lures calling them “the world’s tiniest

spinnerbaits” because you can just lure them through the openings of vegetation on the edges

of the cypress trees. Here is the link of general regulations to fish in Texas if you are ever

interested. (http://tpwd.texas.gov/regulations/outdoor-annual/fishing/general- rules-

regulations/general-fishing- regulations)

Florida blue lake

Florida

Florida is one of the most solid states I have fished. If you are aiming for both quantity and

quality then you can never go wrong with Florida. I have observed that most lakes here are

deep with thons of grass and the best time to fish here is during summer when it’s super hot

and literally no one will be out fishing which makes it a perfect time to fish. Lakes in Florida

have landed a couple of times in Bassmaster’s Top 100 lists as well. Don’t forget to wear

your polarized sunglasses or else you will have a hard time looking at the line under water.

You can never overlook Lake Okeechobee when it comes to Florida as it is the second largest

freshwater body in America and is Florida’s biggest lake. This lake is labelled as the black

bass capital on this planet. Majority of the anglers here practice the catch and release method

but you can keep up to five bass fishes per day. According to Florida’s Fish and Wildlife

Conservation Commission (http://myfwc.com/), there is no minimum size and the bass can

only be either 16 inches or longer in total length per angler. I have used a Zara Spook lure

before and the experience was awesome.

 

Lake Toho located near the city of Kissimmee at the Central of Florida is on the top of my

lists to fish for large ones. I usually have successes aiming for large bass here using live baits

during early spring or late winter especially inshore close to vegetative areas. Spinnerbaits or

imitations are really productive when pitched along grass or hydrilla edges.

 

Conclusion

Bass fishing might become America’s official sport one day. Bass fishing gives a thrilling

experience no matter what kind of technique or lures you use. I’m still light years behind if I

want to become like those pro-anglers out there and I will always strive to achieve the best. If

you’ve never went bass fishing before then come to the US! We will greet you with open

arms.

 

Author Bio: John Lewis, an avid outdoorsman with a passion in fishing and various outdoor

activities. He blogs about his tips and techniques over at http://www.epicwilderness.com/. By

the way, you can check out my buying guide for polarized fishing sunglasses as well.

flickandflyjournal.com

Hamish Webb, Dan Firth, Graham Fifield and Lee Georgeson have been fishing the south-east Australian region since 1987. Since then they’ve become avid sportfishermen who are constantly looking for new ways to challenge themselves. They are all scientists and conservationists who are passionate about the long-term sustainability of the ecosystem in which they live. They promote understanding and appreciation of the complex socio-political, economic and environmental issues surrounding fish, fishing and fisheries, while never losing sight of the various motivations that keep them coming back. In English, that means they love all things fishing and have a damn good time on the water, and that’s all that really counts in the end!

One thought on “Guest post: Bass fishing in the USA: experience and tips

  • February 3, 2017 at 8:43 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Hamish, thanks for the feature 😀

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