Product review: Wildbait Lures

A few years ago, we got in touch with a lovely fellow named Peter Pomorski, maker of Wildbait Lures. I feel horrible that I’ve never written a review until now, but I honestly haven’t had much of a chance to try them out. I’ve recently been getting into using hardbodies more frequently, and wanted to share my experience of using his beautifully handcrafted lures.

One of the reasons it’s taken me so long to give them a go is because I’ve been doing a lot of flyfishing. But I have to be honest: the first time I tried them, I couldn’t get them to swim straight. I think it was probably that I was using a slightly too heavy leader, tied straight through to the eye of the lure. While I like a lure to swim straight when you first take it out of the box, even with a heavier leader, there are some that aren’t very forgiving when using standard leader to lure knots like the blood knot. I’ve been using loop knots more lately, and found that this usually helps lures swim straighter and with a much better action.

Wildbait lure lodged firmly in the mouth!
A Wildbait lure lodged firmly in the mouth!

Wildbait lures come in a few different sizes, and Peter has done a fantastic job of decorating them with a few lovely colours. I’ve recently enjoyed some success on Wildbait Lures. I was fishing my favourite NSW trout stream over the weekend, and had tied on a little Rapala in the rainbow trout pattern. For some reason, I managed to cast the lure off, and watched it float downstream, never to be seen again. Looking around in the box, I saw a few of the Wildbaits, and decided to tie one on using a simple loop knot. It didn’t take long to have the first follow; a lovely brown trout of around 30cm. A small one for this stream.

A few tens of metres up the stream and I was retrieving the lure once again, watching its sexy wiggle as it came towards the bank. The fish I saw wasn’t following, but cruising the bank. I stopped the lure, and it floated towards the surface. I hadn’t seen the fish again, but in an explosion of whitewater, the fish appeared from underneath the bank and smashed the lure. I’ve never seen a trout ‘boof’ a lure, but this was about as close as it gets!

Gnarly fish!
Gnarly fish!

The hooks were sharp and we well embedded, and it wasn’t long before I had the fish in the net. A beautiful brown trout of between 4-5 pounds.

I’ve realised that I didn’t give these lures the respect that they deserved, and for that, Peter, I sincerely apologise! I’d highly recommend giving them a go. The website has some amazingly sexy lures, including the “Minnow 4 BBT” and “Minnow 5 BRT”. They have a beautiful action, decent hooks and lovely colouring. It’s definitely worth using the loop knot, and I’d recommend upgrading the hooks to some Gamakatsu trebles. Check them out at http://wildbait.myshopify.com/

Lee Georgeson

flickandflyjournal.com

Hamish Webb, Dan Firth, Graham Fifield and Lee Georgeson have been fishing the south-east Australian region since 1987. Since then they’ve become avid sportfishermen who are constantly looking for new ways to challenge themselves. They are all scientists and conservationists who are passionate about the long-term sustainability of the ecosystem in which they live. They promote understanding and appreciation of the complex socio-political, economic and environmental issues surrounding fish, fishing and fisheries, while never losing sight of the various motivations that keep them coming back. In English, that means they love all things fishing and have a damn good time on the water, and that’s all that really counts in the end!

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